Simulators

Simulation methodology

Computer-based simulation is normally used when it is too expensive or risky to allow participants to use actual equipment.

Simulation methodology

Since the mid 1970s, Swedish nuclear power plants have used simulators and simulation techniques for testing and validating plant modifications and for training control room personnel. These environments aim to reflect reality to the greatest degree possible. The simulators are full-scale replicas of plant control rooms and give a detailed simulation of plant processes. Used correctly, simulators are excellent tools for teachers and participants alike when it comes to understanding dynamic processes.

In recent years, the use of simulation technology has increased substantially in healthcare and other industries. For training, computer-based simulation is normally used when it is too expensive or risky to allow participants to use actual equipment. It also allows training in what are normally dangerous situations or situations that are difficult to instigate in a real system.

KSU uses a number of simulators:

Basic process simulators

A simulator for understanding a system. General simulation, does not necessarily resemble a plant.

Partial simulator

A simulator for understanding a system and for practising procedures in a limited part of a process or system of the nuclear power plant.

Full-scale simulator

A simulator for operator and shift training. Training in system and interoperability as well as procedure training in a plant-like control room.

GSIM

By definition, a full-scale simulator in which the control room is presented graphically. Simulator for system, interoperability and procedural training.

Read more about our learning environments at ksu.se